Family Violence Intervention Program

Family Violence Intervention Program

Family Violence Intervention Program

The Family Violence Intervention Program FVIP allows for personal, emotional and psychological development in the area of responsiveness to feelings of anger, violence and maladaptive reactions. Most adults were not taught how to respond to situations, feelings, and emotions. Our partnership will allow you to learn these new skills rather quickly, so you can communicate with your loved ones in a loving and healthy manner. For Family Violence Intervention Program (FVIP)class, pleas call us at  404-594-1770.

“The Family Violence Intervention Program (FVIP)is a 24-week course that is created to rehabilitate individuals by holding them accountable and prioritizing victim safety. The thinking, feeling, and behaviors of individuals are reflected in efforts to stop the violence in their families and relationships. Family Violence Intervention Programis focused on assisting individuals to learn new ways to interact with one another without the use of abusive and violent acts. Domestic violence is a violent confrontation between household members that includes sexual assault, physical harm or fear of physical harm. Spouses or former spouses, dating relationships, adults related by blood or marriage, and biological or legal parent-child relationships are all included in family or household members. Probation, protection orders, criminal sentences, and even bond conditions can require the completion of a Family Violence Intervention Program course. Most research tells us that participants who complete FVIPs are less likely to commit new acts of violence or to violate restraining orders” (https://aacsatlanta.com/family-violence-intervention-program/).

Physical Abuse

Physical abuse is a forceful way that an individual utilizes to keep a loved one under control and dominate while creating a state of constant fear. Physical abuse is the primary form of abuse in most relationships. Of course, not all relationships begin with physical abuse, however; the signs could be there early on. The need to control and dominate becomes evident when the victim shows signs of independence or considers personal growth and development. Physical abuse gets worse when the victim vocalizes frustration or considers ending the relationship.

Physical violence includes: using or threatening to use weapons, hurting the victim verbally first, hitting the victim or children, punching, kicking, slapping, strangling, smothering, shoving, throwing things, destroying property, and denying medical treatment.

Sexual Abuse

Sexual abuse is prevalent in abusive relationships. It is uncommon to discuss or report sexual abuse. Many abusers deny sexual abuse and tend to use shaming and humiliating tactics to control the victim.

Sexual abuse comes in many forms and it may include: physically forcing sex, making the victim feel fearful about saying no to sex, violence or name calling during sex, forcing sex with other partners, forcing prostitution, and forcing the victim to participate in demeaning or degrading sexual acts.

Emotional Abuse

Emotional abuse is widely used method by abusive partners seeking control. It is an effective way to manipulate the victim and cause extreme psychological damage. Emotional abuse can lead to lower self-worth and self-doubt. It is common for the victim to begin feeling responsible for the abuse and submit to continued torture. Some victims suffer serious mental health consequences and remain afraid to report their symptoms out of fear.

Emotional abuse comes in a variety of forms: criticisms, name calling, minimizing and rationalizing the abuse or shifting blame for the abusive behavior, threatening andisolating the victim from society and loved ones, jealously, and complete control over who the victim can communicate with.

Financial Abuse

Most victims don’t even realize the extent of financial abuse. It is a powerful way to keep the victim in a vicious cycle. The abuser will take control over all household finances including the victim’s earnings. The abuser will have the sole authority on all finances and make the victim beg for money.

Domestic Violence is Serious

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *